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  • Writer's pictureMichelle Lopez

A Guide to Choosing the Right Business Structure for Your Artisan Goods Business


Starting a business selling artisan goods can be a rewarding and fulfilling experience, but it's important to choose the right business structure from the outset to ensure your business is protected and meets your goals. In this post, we'll explore the different types of business structures, including LLC, Sole Proprietorship, S-Corp, C-Corp, and Non-Profit, to help you determine which is the best fit for your artisan goods business.


LLC (Limited Liability Company)

An LLC is a hybrid business structure that combines the limited liability protection of a corporation with the tax benefits of a partnership or sole proprietorship. With an LLC, owners (known as members) are not personally liable for the debts or obligations of the business. This structure is best for businesses that want to limit personal liability while still enjoying the flexibility and pass-through taxation of a sole proprietorship or partnership.


Sole Proprietorship

A sole proprietorship is a type of business that is owned and operated by one person. This structure is the simplest and most straightforward type of business structure, but it offers no protection for the owner's personal assets. This structure is best for businesses with low liability risk and low startup costs.


S-Corp (S Corporation)

An S-Corp is a type of corporation that is taxed like a partnership. This structure offers limited liability protection for owners (known as shareholders) and allows for pass-through taxation, meaning that the business's income is taxed only once at the shareholder level. S-Corps are best for businesses with multiple owners that want limited liability protection and the ability to share profits and losses.


C-Corp (C Corporation)

A C-Corp is a type of corporation that is taxed as a separate entity. This structure offers limited liability protection for owners (known as shareholders) and allows for raising capital through the sale of stocks. C-Corps are best for businesses that are planning to go public or raise a significant amount of capital.


Non-Profit

A non-profit is a type of business structure that is organized for a specific purpose other than making a profit, such as a charitable organization. Non-profits are exempt from federal income tax and may also be eligible for state tax exemptions. This structure is best for businesses that have a mission to serve the public good and are not primarily focused on generating a profit.


As an expert in business development, my recommendation for a seller of artisan goods would be to consider an LLC or S-Corp structure.

LLCs offer the benefits of limited liability protection and the flexibility of a sole proprietorship or partnership, making them a popular choice for small businesses. S-Corps also provide limited liability protection and allow for pass-through taxation, making them a good option for businesses with multiple owners.


Both LLCs and S-Corps offer protection for personal assets, which is especially important for businesses that may face liability risks, such as those selling physical goods. Additionally, these structures allow for easy management and offer tax benefits, making them a more attractive option compared to a C-Corp.


It's important to note that each business is unique and there may be other factors to consider when choosing a business structure. I would suggest consulting with a legal or financial advisor to determine the best structure for your artisan goods business based on your specific needs and goals.


Choosing the right business structure for your artisan goods business depends on your personal and business goals, as well as your liability and tax considerations. LLCs and S-Corps are popular options for businesses looking for limited liability protection and pass-through taxation, while sole proprietorships are best for businesses with low liability risk and low startup costs. C-Corps are best for businesses that are planning to go public or raise a significant amount of capital, while non-profits are best for businesses that are focused on serving the public good. Be sure to consult with a legal or financial advisor to determine the best structure for your artisan goods business.


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